An Apron – Do you know what it is?

THE  APRON  

by Karimah Bint Dawoud, muslim chaplain & well being writer.

I was sent this delightful post my by Auntie, Mum number 2. I remember my grandma’s, both wearing aprons and hanging cups from hooks in the kitchen and cotton hankies tied around steam puddings.As  I keep telling you, I am old school and have had for years a selection of aprons before I even became grandma. I have fotos of me in aprons and high heels  that would make my mum blush when I was married and I have aprons with holes in them but they are still clean.I have polka dots and I have plastic ones from Harrods. Aprons let’s bring them back, to protect our clothes and wash them less and save water and save money.

Apron - Medium Size


(Notice that a “Medium” is a size 14 – 16)
The History of  ‘APRONS’        

I don’t think our kids 
know what an apron is. 
The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material.  But along with that, it served as a potholder for  removing 
hot pans from the oven.  
 
It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.   

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven. 

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.. Aprons...one of them

And when the weather was cold Grandma wrapped it around her arms. 

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, 
bent over the hot wood stove.  

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron. 

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. 
After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. 

In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.

Send this to those who would know (and love) the story about Grandma’s aprons.  

REMEMBER:    

   Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool.  Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill 
to thaw.  
They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.  
I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron – but love… 

Aprons on the washing line

 

Aprons are also mention in the Islamic sunnah, however it must be noted that there was context in which the women tore their aprons to cover their faces when strange men who were travellers past them.

 

Aishah said: “May Allah bestow His Mercy on the early emigrant women when Allah I revealed, which meaning of is translated as:

 

“and to draw their veils all over Juyubihinna (i.e. their bodies, faces, necks and bosoms)’ (24:31)

 

¾ they tore their Muruts ( a woolen dress, or a waist -binding cloth or an apron, etc.) and covered their faces with those torn Muruts.” (Reported by Al-Bukhari). Safiya bint Shaiba narrated that “AishahÇ used to say: “When the verse: `They should cover (draw their veils over) their bodies, faces, necks, and bosoms (24:31)’ was revealed, (the ladies) cut their waist sheets at the edges and covered their heads and faces with those cut pieces of cloth.” (Reported by Al-Bukhari and Abu Dawud). 

 

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “An Apron – Do you know what it is?

  1. I loved this post! I am a twenty something mama of one and I always wear an apron in the kitchen… I love it and love your list of uses.

  2. Mash’Allaah a lovely article Sister – I remember my Mum and Nanna both used Aprons…do you remember tea-cosies, have you ever eaten a REAL Cornish pasty from Cornwall? And yes I remember the multitudes of different pies and crumbles my Mum used to make, ALL with homemade pastry and that wonderful little thing like an upside down egg cup to hold up the pastry in the middle !!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s